“Media Literacy in Every Classroom” Quick Reference Guide for Educators Now Available

Teachers looking for a basic guide to media literacy in K-12 education can now purchase “Media Literacy in Every Classroom,” a quick reference guide co-authored by Dr. Faith Rogow and Project Look Sharp’s executive director Cyndy Scheibe. This guide was published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) on Sept. 14, and is available for only $12.95, with additional discounts for members and bulk purchases.

The idea for the guide began when Dr. Rogow and Dr. Scheibe were considering doing a simpler version of their book The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy: Critical Thinking in a Multimedia World (Corwin/Sage, 2012). Around the same time, ASCD editor Carol Collins contacted them and asked for a resource based on Project Look Sharp’s “12 Basic Ways to Integrate Media Literacy and Critical Thinking into Any Curriculum ” booklet (also written by Scheibe and Rogow), which was now out of date . In response, Rogow and Scheibe constructed the new guide so that teachers of grades K-12 could easily integrate media literacy activities into their curriculum. The publication of the guide has also led to Project Look Sharp’s invitation to present at the ASCD annual conference in March 2018 to further elaborate on the resource’s content.

The laminated, full-color guide covers the basics of media literacy, the process of becoming media literate, insights, and key questions for analyzing media messages – a total of almost fifty classroom integration strategies. These strategies include specific examples in topics such as: social studies, health, STEM, English, and the arts. Through this quick reference guide, teachers will be able to implement media literacy into research projects, classroom assessments, and make real-world connections – giving students the tools to think critically for themselves.

Published by and available only through ASCD, the six-page guide may also be purchased in sets of twenty-five with a bulk discount, and members receive an additional discount. The hole-punched edge also provides an easy storage option for 3 ring binders and folders.

To purchase the “Media Literacy in Every Classroom,” visit: https://goo.gl/96jHvW

For more information and materials from Project Look Sharp go to projectlooksharp.org.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Master List of CAPS Resources

Lifton CAPS

 

 

 

 

MS Sustainability

 

 

MCPC 2016

https://www.projectlooksharp.org/front_end.php?resource_id=395

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Project Look Sharp and Facing History and Ourselves Collaborate for “Breaking Down the News” Workshop

There’s still time to register for Project Look Sharp’s next event. Curriculum Dirctor Chris Sperry will be co-facilitating a new workshop with Facing History and Ourselves’ Juan Castellanos. The workshop titled “Breaking Down the News” will occur on October 6th at Brockway Hall, SUNY Cortland in Central New York. Presented content is aimed towards teachers of grades 4 – 12 who are searching for methods in educating students on analyzing and navigating the news media landscape. Students will then be able to make informed decisions and contribute to the complex, communication-based world.

The event addresses the following educational standards:

  • Demonstrate content knowledge
  • Use researched-based practices/evidence of learning
  • Clearly/accurately communicate with students
  • Connect concepts and engage learners
  • Create an intellectually challenging environment
  • Engage in ongoing professional development
  • Set high expectations/challenging learning
  • Use diverse instructional strategies
  • Use a variety of approaches to meet student needs

The workshop lasts from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and costs only $35 for registration. To register or access more information on the workshop, visit Frontline/MLP at TST BOCES or follow the link: https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=10453&I=2511185

To stay updated on more news from Project Look Sharp, visit the website: projectlooksharp.org.

 

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Project Look Sharp and NCSS Educate Teachers with Media Literacy Workshops at Newseum, Washington D.C.

Teachers are now ready for the fall thanks to Project Look Sharp’s intensive three-day workshop this past summer. From July 24th to 26th, Project Look Sharp facilitated media literacy training and teachings to a wide variety of educators. Taking place in the Newseum, Washington, DC, the event was hosted by Project Look Sharp’s Chris Sperry and Cyndy Scheibe along with the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and the education staff at the Newseum. Content ranged from how to integrate media literacy into curriculum materials, creating an inquiry-based and interactive classroom, to preparing students to critically analyze their confirmation bias.

The training extended to teachers of middle and high school as well as college faculty, with department chairs and consultants working with educators participating. The three-day workshop also allowed further opportunities for individual coaching. Afterwards, Project Look Sharp’s Sperry and Scheibe both received accolades from the audience. Specific responses from the survey read:

“Project Sharp has far exceeded my expectations with concrete materials that I can start using right away in my classroom.”

“I enjoyed the strong modeling of practice by Cyndy and Chris. They provided a great example of how to develop media literacy skills.”

“First the presentations were informative, enriching and very balanced in presentation models. Second, the sharing of experiences was very positive. Third, the coaching and practice made a wonderful closing to the activity.”

“Thank you for offering Project Sharp as a workshop. It’s the best PD I’ve taken so far in my 8-year-career.”

To learn more information on Project Look Sharp and our activities, be sure to visit projectlooksharp.org.

 

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

 

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Project Look Sharp Presents at the 2017 NAMLE Conference

Project Look Sharp is excited to announce that Cyndy Scheibe and Chris Sperry were featured at the 2017 National Association of Media Literacy Educators Conference, “Engaging Citizens, Building Community”. The conference was held on June 26-28th at Roosevelt University in Chicago, IL.

Cyndy and Chris led and moderated a wide variety of workshops and presentations at this important biennial national conference:
• Media Literacy and Health: Building a Dynamic Community to Change the Landscape of K-12 Health through Media Literacy (Scheibe)
• Media Inquiry That Teaches Students How to Question Their World (Scheibe/Sperry)
• Critical Media Literacy & Environmental Justice (Sperry)
• History Communication in a Multimedia Landscape (Scheibe/Moderator)
• The Contextual Approach to News Literacy: Facilitating Engagement by Learning about Media Systems and Institutions (Scheibe/Moderator)
• Pedagogies of Persistence: Civic Media in the Teaching and Learning of Everyday Activism in Democratic Life (Sperry/Moderator)
• Using Media & Media Literacy to Develop Agency (Sperry/Moderator)

Full Program Descriptions

Media Literacy & Health
Since its beginnings, media literacy education has addressed the role of media in the decisions individuals make regarding their
health. This dialogue session brings scholars, educators and medical
professionals together to discuss the role that media literacy education can play in promoting a healthy living among youth.
The Contextual Approach to News Literacy
Media Literacy, Institutions & Representations
Media literacy’s core concepts address the influence media industries and institutions have on media messages, and the meanings made by audiences. The political economy of news media is a topic of special importance in today’s cultural climate. This dialogue session brings together scholars sharing research related to the relationship of media institutions and representations.

History Communication in a Multimedia Landscape
Social studies classrooms have traditionally provided a productive context for media literacy education. This dialogue session brings together scholars and educators to discuss the intersection of media literacy and history and present resources to help educators address these issues with their students.

Engaging Every Student:
Media Inquiry That Teaches Students How to Question Their World
This interactive session will model constructivist pedagogy and strong-sense critical thinking through examining news literacy and sustainability education. We will present videos of classroom decoding, a revised version of our Key Questions, a graphic of the process of media literacy, and NCSS’ new Media Literacy Position Paper for social studies.
Critical Media Literacy & Environmental Justice
Climate change is already impacting life on Earth, and media messages about this problem are a crucial space for students to critically question and respond to environmental issues. A panel of media literacy educators who have been researching, writing, and teaching about environmental justice will share their thoughts, practices, and resources for promoting ecomedia literacy.
Pedagogies of Persistence: Civic Media in the Teaching and Learning of Everyday Activism in Democratic Life
This workshop will explore the phenomenon of persistence–what we are defining as sustained and long-term teaching and learning that shapes pedagogy around equality and inclusion–in support of sustained civic engagement, participation, and action from classrooms to communities. The discussion will frame media and digital literacies in an age of increased polarization and declining civic trust. We will engage in roundtable workshopping and dialogue with participants around the challenges they face in their classrooms and communities, and use this to articulate and document best practices for teaching and learning “persistence” in the age of polarization.

Using Media & Media Literacy to Develop Agency
Agency is media literacy in action. This panel will explore the relationships between media literacy education, civic participation and community building within our contemporary culture. It will consider the many forms that agency takes and how that agency might be exercised both inside and outside classrooms. Change agents might be teachers, parents, broadcasters, filmmakers, corporations, students and more. The presentation will consider meanings of agency, then describe how several are playing out in the real world. Participants will gain a thorough understanding of agency and explore how they and others might develop and exercise their own agency. Some of the presenters will appear in person while others will join by video conference.

For more information regarding the 2017 NAMLE Conference, visit
https://namleconference.net/

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

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Special Screening and Discussion at Cinemapolis: The Film “1984” and Media Literacy Discussion with Project Look Sharp

In the book “1984” by George Orwell, on April 4, Winston Smith began questioning Big Brother. On the same date, people will gather across the United States to watch the film 1984 and discuss its relevance today. Cinemapolis of Downtown Ithaca will be one of over 180 art house movie theaters across the country in 165 cities and in 43 states to participate collectively in the national event screening of the movie. We invite you to join this special event on April 4 at 7 p.m. at 120 E Green St. in Ithaca.

After the screening, Cyndy Scheibe and Chris Sperry (directors of Ithaca College’s media literacy program Project Look Sharp) will lead an interactive discussion about education, critical thinking and media literacy in the age of “Fake News”. Proceeds will support Project Look Sharp’s work helping educators teach critical thinking and media literacy skills nationally and in our region.

All educators will receive the Cinemapolis member discount price for this special event, and may also bring one guest free of charge.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

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