Project Look Sharp Creates New Collaborative Activity Production (CAP) Initiative

With support from the Park Foundation, Project Look Sharp has created a new, online media literacy tool to bring the organization and educators closer together. The Park Foundation’s grant will allow those who have previously used Project Look Sharp’s tools for simple media literacy curriculum integration to involve themselves in a unique, collaborative process in developing activities for others. Though the user submission feature is currently in beta testing, many lessons already exist in this program.

An example of CAP set “Throwaway Culture: To Buy or to Reuse?” is linked below. This example contains four short video clips of commercials to analyze and information on food waste for context. From these materials, educators may base a media literacy activity for their curriculums. The example is linked here: https://www.projectlooksharp.org/front_end.php?resource_id=402

To view a list of CAPS resources, see: https://projectlooksharp.org/blog/2017/10/04/master-list-caps-resources/

For more information on Project Look Sharp please visit: projectlooksharp.org.
Further questions may be sent to Curriculum Designer Sox Sperry at: soxsperry@twcny.rr.com


Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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The League of Women Voters and Tompkins County Public Library Present: “IS THAT REALLY TRUE? FACTS OR FAKE NEWS?”

IS THAT REALLY TRUE? FACTS OR FAKE NEWS?

DATE: Monday, October 23, 2017, 7-9pm

PLACE: Borg-Warner Room
Tompkins County Public Library

101 East Green Street, Ithaca, NY

PANELISTS:
• Michael Engle, Library Research and Learning Services, Cornell University

• Chris Sperry, Director of Curriculum and Staff Development for Project Look Sharp, Ithaca College

• Neill Borowski, Executive Editor, Ithaca Journal

With the increase in social media use, the broad range of media outlets claiming to deliver the news, and the finger pointing about what is and is not true, it is important for citizens to evaluate the reliability of what we read, see and hear. Please join us for three perspectives on building media

literacy. Ample time will be provided for Q/A and discussion.

THIS EVENT IS FREE OF CHARGE. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED.

Printable Flyer:

LWVTC.Fake News-rev (pdf)

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“Media Literacy in Every Classroom” Quick Reference Guide for Educators Now Available

Teachers looking for a basic guide to media literacy in K-12 education can now purchase “Media Literacy in Every Classroom,” a quick reference guide co-authored by Dr. Faith Rogow and Project Look Sharp’s executive director Cyndy Scheibe. This guide was published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) on Sept. 14, and is available for only $12.95, with additional discounts for members and bulk purchases.

The idea for the guide began when Dr. Rogow and Dr. Scheibe were considering doing a simpler version of their book The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy: Critical Thinking in a Multimedia World (Corwin/Sage, 2012). Around the same time, ASCD editor Carol Collins contacted them and asked for a resource based on Project Look Sharp’s “12 Basic Ways to Integrate Media Literacy and Critical Thinking into Any Curriculum ” booklet (also written by Scheibe and Rogow), which was now out of date . In response, Rogow and Scheibe constructed the new guide so that teachers of grades K-12 could easily integrate media literacy activities into their curriculum. The publication of the guide has also led to Project Look Sharp’s invitation to present at the ASCD annual conference in March 2018 to further elaborate on the resource’s content.

The laminated, full-color guide covers the basics of media literacy, the process of becoming media literate, insights, and key questions for analyzing media messages – a total of almost fifty classroom integration strategies. These strategies include specific examples in topics such as: social studies, health, STEM, English, and the arts. Through this quick reference guide, teachers will be able to implement media literacy into research projects, classroom assessments, and make real-world connections – giving students the tools to think critically for themselves.

Published by and available only through ASCD, the six-page guide may also be purchased in sets of twenty-five with a bulk discount, and members receive an additional discount. The hole-punched edge also provides an easy storage option for 3 ring binders and folders.

To purchase the “Media Literacy in Every Classroom,” visit: https://goo.gl/96jHvW

For more information and materials from Project Look Sharp go to projectlooksharp.org.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Master List of CAPS Resources

Lifton CAPS

 

 

 

 

MS Sustainability

 

 

MCPC 2016

https://www.projectlooksharp.org/front_end.php?resource_id=395

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Project Look Sharp and Facing History and Ourselves Collaborate for “Breaking Down the News” Workshop

There’s still time to register for Project Look Sharp’s next event. Curriculum Dirctor Chris Sperry will be co-facilitating a new workshop with Facing History and Ourselves’ Juan Castellanos. The workshop titled “Breaking Down the News” will occur on October 6th at Brockway Hall, SUNY Cortland in Central New York. Presented content is aimed towards teachers of grades 4 – 12 who are searching for methods in educating students on analyzing and navigating the news media landscape. Students will then be able to make informed decisions and contribute to the complex, communication-based world.

The event addresses the following educational standards:

  • Demonstrate content knowledge
  • Use researched-based practices/evidence of learning
  • Clearly/accurately communicate with students
  • Connect concepts and engage learners
  • Create an intellectually challenging environment
  • Engage in ongoing professional development
  • Set high expectations/challenging learning
  • Use diverse instructional strategies
  • Use a variety of approaches to meet student needs

The workshop lasts from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and costs only $35 for registration. To register or access more information on the workshop, visit Frontline/MLP at TST BOCES or follow the link: https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=10453&I=2511185

To stay updated on more news from Project Look Sharp, visit the website: projectlooksharp.org.

 

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Project Look Sharp and NCSS Educate Teachers with Media Literacy Workshops at Newseum, Washington D.C.

Teachers are now ready for the fall thanks to Project Look Sharp’s intensive three-day workshop this past summer. From July 24th to 26th, Project Look Sharp facilitated media literacy training and teachings to a wide variety of educators. Taking place in the Newseum, Washington, DC, the event was hosted by Project Look Sharp’s Chris Sperry and Cyndy Scheibe along with the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and the education staff at the Newseum. Content ranged from how to integrate media literacy into curriculum materials, creating an inquiry-based and interactive classroom, to preparing students to critically analyze their confirmation bias.

The training extended to teachers of middle and high school as well as college faculty, with department chairs and consultants working with educators participating. The three-day workshop also allowed further opportunities for individual coaching. Afterwards, Project Look Sharp’s Sperry and Scheibe both received accolades from the audience. Specific responses from the survey read:

“Project Sharp has far exceeded my expectations with concrete materials that I can start using right away in my classroom.”

“I enjoyed the strong modeling of practice by Cyndy and Chris. They provided a great example of how to develop media literacy skills.”

“First the presentations were informative, enriching and very balanced in presentation models. Second, the sharing of experiences was very positive. Third, the coaching and practice made a wonderful closing to the activity.”

“Thank you for offering Project Sharp as a workshop. It’s the best PD I’ve taken so far in my 8-year-career.”

To learn more information on Project Look Sharp and our activities, be sure to visit projectlooksharp.org.

 

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

 

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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